Posts Tagged ‘short sales’

Facing Foreclosure? Know Your Deductions and Credits

 Facing Foreclosure? Know Your Deductions and Credits

 According to NPR, more than half the nation saw a spike in foreclosures last month. With more and more homeowners facing foreclosures, experts at The Tax Institute at H&R Block offer the following information on credits and deductions, which can provide assistance to individuals prior to and after this unfortunate circumstance.

• Mortgage Debt Forgiveness: homeowners who experienced foreclosure on their primary home may be able to exclude the amount of canceled debt from their taxable income if they meet specific criteria.

• Mortgage Interest Deduction: taxpayers are eligible to deduct qualified mortgage interest on their main home and a second home if they itemize deductions on Schedule A.

o They must be legally liable for repayment of the loan to deduct the loan interest.

o For 2011 filings, taxpayers who could not pay at least 20 percent of their down payment may have been required by their lender to pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI). If the taxpayer qualifies, the PMI may be deductible as mortgage interest.

• Real Estate Taxes: homeowners are able to deduct real estate taxes separately from mortgage interest on Schedule A and from property taxes.

• Non-Business Energy Property Credit: taxpayers may claim energy-efficiency credits for up to 10 percent of the cost of various home energy-efficiency improvements.

• Residential Energy Efficient Property Credit: a nonrefundable personal credit is available for property used to produce energy in a personal residence located in the US .

o The credit is also available for wind energy property and geothermal pumps.

o Real estate taxes must be based on the home’s value and assessed at least annually.

Article printed from RISMedia: http://rismedia.com

 

Joel Thompson RE/MAX Alliance

joelathompson@hotmail.com 303-877-0060

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NAR Collaborates with U.S. Treasury on Short Sale ‘Help for Homeowners’

NAR Collaborates with U.S. Treasury on Short Sale ‘Help for Homeowners’

RISMEDIA, — A new National Association of REALTORS® collaboration with the U.S. Department of the Treasury will help REALTORS® better assist homeowners who are struggling to sell their homes in a short sale.
REALTORS® who attend upcoming Making Home Affordable “Help for Homeowners” outreach events, sponsored by the Treasury Department, will learn insights to help them navigate the short sale process and have the opportunity to meet directly with loan servicers on their clients’ behalf for assistance with difficult transactions.
“As the nation’s leading advocate for homeownership and housing issues, REALTORS® are working hard to keep more people in their homes, and when a family is absolutely unable keep their home, REALTORS® are there to help homeowners by facilitating a loan modification or short sale,” said NAR President Moe Veissi. “I encourage our REALTORS® members to participate in these new events so that they have the tools and information to help distressed homeowners achieve the best possible outcome.”
Help for Homeowners community events will take place throughout the year; the first session was held on the 22nd, with an additional event on the 24th. More events are scheduled in Chicago, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, and Sacramento, Calif.
At the events, REALTORS® can attend workshops to hear directly from lenders and loan servicers about executing short sales in today’s challenging market. They’ll learn tips on how to navigate the short sale process, effectively negotiate short sale offers and expedite transactions. REALTORS® will also hear from Treasury officials about various foreclosure prevention programs, and specifically the Home Affordable Foreclosure Alternatives (HAFA) short sale program. Live webinars from the workshop will be available to real estate professionals who can’t attend in person.
The sessions for real estate professionals are not open to homeowners, but borrowers who are in financial distress and concerned about losing their home to foreclosure are encouraged to attend the free homeowner sessions.
Homeowners who are having difficulty paying their mortgage will be able to meet one-on-one with loan servicers and housing counselors to explore foreclosure prevention options and work toward solutions to their mortgage problems. Real estate professionals are encouraged to invite homeowners and their clients to the events and are welcome to accompany their clients in conversations with the servicers.
“REALTORS® embrace the opportunity to partner with the Treasury Department and drive participation at upcoming “Help for Homeowners” events. Working together we can improve the success rate for short sale transactions, which will reduce the overall number of foreclosures and benefit sellers, lenders, buyers and the entire community,” said Veissi.
Additional information for consumers about the “Help for Homeowners” events is at www.makinghomeaffordable.gov/get-assistance/homeowner-events/Pages/default.aspx. Real estate professionals can get more information or register to attend at www.hmpadmin.com/portal/resources/eventinfo.jsp.
For more information, visit www.realtor.org.

Check me out at www.bouldercoloradorealty.com

Joel Thompson 303-877-0060 joelathompson@hotmail.com

 

What is a Short Sale?

What is a Short Sale?

 

What is a Short Sale?
A short sale or short payoff is generally defined as a sale in which a lender allows the property securing a mortgage or deed of trust to be sold
for less then the existing loan balance, due to factors such as the borrower’s financial circumstances, the property’s physical condition, or
local real estate market conditions. A short sale is really a form of pre-foreclosure sale that occurs when the mortgagee agrees to accept less than the loan amount to avoid foreclosure. A negotiated short sale may result in a discounted purchase price for the buyer. The buyer then finances the acquisition much the same as in any conventional real estate acquisition.
Complexity of Short Sales
Short sales are extremely complex transactions, even for the experienced Realtor. Part of the reason is that they are time-consuming.
Lenders are inundated with requests for short sales and therefore expect all paperwork to be complete and accurate before even considering a short sale. Lenders may also request that the paperwork be resubmitted multiple times, and just getting the file itself to the lender can
sometimes present a challenge. Additionally, there is no regulation or industry standard for short sales, meaning every lender may have different requirements and expectations. Even a Realtor who is familiar with the requirements of one lender may not know the ins and outs of another lender’s requirements. Furthermore, lenders’ policies and processes can change often and even vary by investor.

Factors the Lender May Consider
What makes a lender decide whether to take a discount on a mortgage? What formula do they use to decide how much to take? These
are tricky questions. Each of these transactions must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, and there are a number of variables involved in each one. A borrower is often in default or will be soon when the lender decides to take a discount. There may be instances where there is no
default; this usually means that the borrower is upside down on the mortgage and what is owed exceeds the value of the house. There are a number of factors that a lender may consider when deciding whether to discount a loan and by how much, including the borrower’s overall financial condition and circumstances, the property’s “as is” value, and the cost to market and re-sell the property. Also, two short sales at the same bank may actually be held by different investors, so the percentages and “formulas” for approval may vary even with the same bank. A short sale is usually the lender’s last resort before foreclosure. Overall, the goal is to show the lender that a short sale is the quickest and best way to mitigate their loss. Some lenders will only approve a short sale when foreclosure is not economically feasible because the
borrower is insolvent and one or more of the following may have occurred:
• The property was purchased or refinanced at the top of a seller’s market at an over-inflated price, and a substantial drop in value has occurred.
• The property was financed as an interest-only adjustable rate loan and the borrower has no capacity to refinance at a lower interest rate.
• The property was refinanced at more than 100% of its value.
• The property is located in an area where property values have dropped due to local economic conditions, or the home’s value has decreased to an amount below the loan balance due.
• The property’s “as is” condition has deteriorated to a point where it is not feasible for the lender to put it in a marketable resale condition.
• The proposed purchase price is more than the lender would be able to sell property for after foreclosure.
• Any sales commission proposed in a contract is less than what the lender may typically have to allocate after the foreclosure process is
complete to market and sell the property. The lender will also do a market analysis of the property. The Broker’s Price Opinion (BPO) may be the single most influential component the lender considers when deciding how much they are willing to accept as a reasonable short sale offer. The lender hires a real estate agent, broker, or appraiser to assess the property and give their professional opinion of its value to the lender.
Documentation
Most lenders ask the borrower to document their hardship prior to approval of the sale. The lender will request at least the following information or consideration of a short sale:
• a personal hardship letter that defines what the hardship is and proof of the hardship claim, if available;
• a Third Party Disclosure for authorization to speak to the Realtor or other representative about the loan status;
• a completed financial worksheet of net income and monthly expenses;
• copies of the last two years’ Federal Income Tax returns with all schedules;
• copies of last two months’ payroll stubs, or profit-and-loss statement if self employed;
• copies of last two months’ bank statements for all accounts;
• a copy of the sales contract signed by both the seller and the buyer; and
• estimated closing costs showing a detailed breakdown of all projected costs including Realtor commissions for listing and selling agents.
Once the lender has the above information, it could take three to twelve months to negotiate and close a short sale, depending on the lender.
It really is a “numbers game,” with the lender in control. Not every homeowner facing foreclosure is a good short sale candidate. A giant step to getting a lender to consider your short sale proposal is to have as much information ready as possible to expedite the process, and to
work with short sale specialist, like Joel Thompson at RE/MAX Alliance

If you’re considering selling your home contact me to discuss your options. JoelAthompson@hotmail.com Search Boulder short sales

** Denver Business Journal, “20% of Colorado Mortgage’s Upside-
Down,” February 24, 2010.
** DSNews, “Short sales See Big Jump in Activity,”
February 22, 2010.
Disclaimer: This publication is designed to provide accurate
and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter
covered. It is distributed with the understanding that the
publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting,
or other professional service. If legal or accounting advice
or other expert assistance is required, the services of a
competent professional should be sought.
© Copyright, 2010, by Land Title Guarantee Company

Foreclosure Homes Account for 24 Percent of All U.S. Residential Sales

Foreclosure Homes Account for 24 Percent of All U.S. Residential Sales
 

RISMEDIA, Friday, March 02, 2012— RealtyTrac® , a leading online marketplace for foreclosure properties, recently released its Q4 and Year-End 2011 U.S. Foreclosure Sales Report™, which shows that sales of homes that were in some stage of foreclosure or bank owned accounted for 24 percent of all U.S. residential sales during the fourth quarter—up from 20 percent of all sales in the previous quarter, but down from 26 percent of all sales in the fourth quarter of 2010.Third parties purchased a total of 204,080 residential properties in some stage of pre-foreclosure (NOD, LIS, NTS, NFS) or bank-owned (REO) during the fourth quarter, down 8 percent from a revised third quarter total and down 2 percent from the fourth quarter of 2010. That brought total foreclosure-related sales in 2011 to 907,138, down 2 percent from 2010 and accounting for 23 percent of all sales during the year.The average sales price of homes in foreclosure or bank owned was $164,944 in the fourth quarter, nearly identical to the average foreclosure-related sales price in the previous quarter and down 5 percent from the fourth quarter of 2010. The average price of a foreclosure-related sale was 29 percent below the average price of a non-foreclosure sale during the quarter, down from a 34 percent foreclosure discount in the third quarter and down from a 35 percent foreclosure discount in the fourth quarter of 2010.

“Sales of foreclosures in the fourth quarter continued to be slowed by questions surrounding proper foreclosure paperwork and procedures,” says Brandon Moore, chief executive officer of RealtyTrac. “Even so, foreclosures accounted for nearly one in every four sales during the quarter and for the entire year. We expect to see foreclosure-related sales increase in 2012, particularly pre-foreclosure sales, as lenders start to more aggressively dispose of distressed assets held up by the mortgage servicing gridlock over the past 18 months.

“We continued to see a shift toward pre-foreclosure sales, or short sales, and away from REO sales in the fourth quarter,” Moore continued. “Nationally, pre-foreclosure sales increased 15 percent from a year ago while REO sales decreased 12 percent. Pre-foreclosure sales outnumbered REO sales in several bellwether markets, including Los Angeles, Miami and Phoenix, where REO sales had outnumbered pre-foreclosure sales a year ago. That trend will likely show up in more local markets in 2012 as lenders recognize short sales as a better option for many of their non-performing loans.”

Pre-foreclosure sales increase 15 percent from year ago
Third parties purchased a total of 88,303 pre-foreclosure homes—in default or scheduled for auction—during the fourth quarter, a decrease of 5 percent from the previous quarter but up 15 percent from the fourth quarter of 2010. Pre-foreclosure sales accounted for 10 percent of all sales during the fourth quarter and 9 percent of all sales for all of 2011.

Pre-foreclosure sales increased more than 20 percent on a year-over-year basis in several states, including Michigan (103 percent), Georgia (59 percent), Arizona (48 percent), Washington (36 percent), Nevada (29 percent), Oregon (27 percent), Illinois (26 percent), Ohio (25 percent), California (23 percent) and Texas (22 percent).

Pre-foreclosures, which are often sold via short sale, sold for an average of $184,221 in the fourth quarter, down 3 percent from the previous quarter and down 11 percent from the fourth quarter of 2010. The average sales price of a pre-foreclosure home in the fourth quarter was 21 percent below the average sales price of a non-foreclosure home, similar to the discount of 22 percent on pre-foreclosure purchases for the entire year.

Pre-foreclosure homes that sold in the fourth quarter took an average of 308 days to sell after starting the foreclosure process, down from an average of 318 days in the third quarter but still up from an average of 237 days in the fourth quarter of 2010.

REO sales decrease 12 percent from year ago
Third parties purchased a total of 115,777 bank-owned (REO) homes in the fourth quarter, down 10 percent from the previous quarter and down 12 percent from the fourth quarter of 2010. REO sales accounted for 13 percent of all sales during the fourth quarter and 14 percent of all sales for all of 2011.

Despite the nationwide decrease, REO sales increased 20 percent or more on a year-over-year basis in several states, including Minnesota (65 percent), Wisconsin (23 percent), Washington (21 percent) and Illinois (20 percent).

REOs sold for an average of $149,686 in the fourth quarter, up 2 percent from the previous quarter but down 2 percent from the fourth quarter of 2010. The average sales price of a bank-owned home in the fourth quarter was 36 percent below the average sales price of a non-foreclosure home, while the discount on bank-owned homes for the entire year was 40 percent.

REOs that sold in the fourth quarter took an average of 175 days to sell after completing the foreclosure process, down from 193 days in the third quarter but still up from 171 days in the fourth quarter of 2010.

Nevada, California, Georgia post highest percentage of foreclosure sales
Foreclosure sales accounted for 56 percent of all residential sales in Nevada in the fourth quarter, the highest percentage of any state. Third parties purchased a total of 52,086 homes in foreclosure or bank-owned in Nevada during all of 2011, representing 54 percent of all sales and up 17 percent from 2010.

California foreclosure-related sales accounted for 43 percent of the state’s total residential property sales in the fourth quarter, the second highest percentage among the states. Third parties purchased a total of 246,780 homes in foreclosure or bank-owned in California during all of 2011, the most of any state and up 2 percent from 2010.

Foreclosure sales accounted for 39 percent of all residential sales in Georgia in the fourth quarter, the third highest percentage of any state. Third parties purchased a total of 44,631 homes in foreclosure or bank-owned in Georgia during all of 2011, representing 36 percent of all sales and up 18 percent from 2010.

Other states where foreclosure-related sales accounted for 20 percent or more of all sales in the fourth quarter were Arizona (38 percent), Michigan (33 percent), Colorado (26 percent), Illinois (26 percent), Minnesota (23 percent), Washington (21 percent), and Florida (20 percent).

Top metros to buy bank-owned
Among metro areas with at least 500 REO sales during the fourth quarter and where REO sales increased at least 5 percent from a year ago, the following posted the biggest discounts on sales of bank-owned properties.

Top metros to buy pre-foreclosure (short sales)
Among metro areas with at least 500 pre-foreclosure (short) sales during the fourth quarter and where pre-foreclosure sales increased at least 5 percent from a year ago, the following posted the biggest discounts on sales of pre-foreclosure properties. A few metro areas (Chicago, Atlanta and Seattle) are on both lists, demonstrating that buyers are finding substantial discounts on both short sales and bank-owned homes in these markets.

For more information, visit www.realtytrac.com.

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